Thursday, 24 June 2021 09:06

LIFE ORIENTATION GRADE 12 - EXAMINATION GUIDELINES 2021

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LIFE ORIENTATION
EXAMINATION GUIDELINES
GRADE 12
2021

TABLE OF CONTENTS  Page 
1. INTRODUCTION  3
2. ASSESSMENT IN GRADE 12 
2.1 Format of the external Common Assessment Task (CAT) 
2.2 Outline of examination 
2.3 Cognitive levels 
2.4 Taxonomy of thinking skills 7
4
4
5
6
7
3. DEPTH/SCOPE OF CONTENT 8
4. MARK ALLOCATION  9
5. CONTENT AND CONTEXT GUIDELINES  10
6. RESOURCES   11
7. MARKING GUIDELINES  11
8. CONCLUSION 12

1. INTRODUCTION
The Curriculum and Assessment Policy Statement (CAPS) for Engineering Graphics and Design outlines the nature and purpose of the subject Engineering Graphics and Design. This guides the philosophy underlying the teaching and assessment of the subject in Grade 12.
The purpose of these Examination Guidelines is to:

  • Provide clarity on the depth and scope of the content to be assessed in the Grade 12 National Senior Certificate (NSC) Examination in Engineering Graphics and Design.
  • Assist teachers to adequately prepare learners for the NSC examinations.

This document deals with the final Grade 12 external examinations. It does not deal in any depth with the School-based Assessment (SBA), Performance Assessment Tasks (PATs) or final external practical examinations as these are clarified in a separate PAT document which is updated annually.
These Examination Guidelines should be read in conjunction with:

  • The National Curriculum Statement (NCS) Curriculum and Assessment Policy Statement (CAPS): Engineering Graphics and Design
  • The National Protocol of Assessment: An addendum to the policy document, the National Senior Certificate: A qualification at Level 4 on the National Qualifications Framework (NQF), regarding the National Protocol for Assessment (Grades R–12)
  • The national policy pertaining to the programme and promotion requirements of the National Curriculum Statement, Grades R–12

2. ASSESSMENT IN GRADE 12
2.1 Format of the external Common Assessment Task (CAT)

  • The external Common Assessment Task will consist of a 100-mark question paper of at least 2½ hours.
  • All topics and subtopics in the Grade 12 CAPS will be assessed, which may include 10% of the Grades 10 and 11 CAPS content. The Grades 10 and 11 content will also be considered to be foundational underpinning knowledge.
  • The examination will comprehensively address content, knowledge and skills covered from Term 1 to 4 in Grade 12.
  • Various types of questions will be incorporated and focus primarily on the application of knowledge in an integrated manner.
  • The question paper may also include content related to Physical Education.
  • This question paper is divided into THREE sections:
    • SECTIONS A and B are COMPULSORY.
    • SECTION A consists of three or more different types of questions requiring short responses and explanations.
    • SECTION B consists of two 20-mark questions to which learners must provide direct responses.
    • SECTION C consists of three 20-mark questions of which learners must answer TWO questions.

2.2 Outline of examination
The outline below will be followed when setting Life Orientation question papers.

SECTION A: 20 MARKS   SECTION B: 40 MARKS  SECTION C: 40 MARKS  

All questions are COMPULSORY. All questions are COMPULSORY.

  • A short source may be used to contextualise some of the questions.
  • The questions must include a combination of THREE or more types of questions from the list below:
    • Multiple-choice questions
    • One-word responses (list, state, provide, give)
    • Definitions
    • Short explanations (why, how, describe, explain, discuss)
  • Questions should test understanding and factual knowledge.
  • Responses should be short and direct.
  • Mark allocation for the questions should range between 1–2 marks. 

All questions are COMPULSORY. All questions are COMPULSORY.

  • Learners will answer TWO 20-mark questions. Short open-ended questions could be:
    • Scenario-based
    • Source-based
    • Case study
    • Cartoon
    • Illustration
    • Graph
  • Questions should be knowledge-based, from information learners have acquired from the Life Orientation content in the FET band.
  • Learners should display, present and apply knowledge and skills gained from the Life Orientation content.
  • Mark allocation for questions in this section could range between 2–4 marks in total per question.
Learners will answer TWO 20-mark questions out of THREE.
  • Questions will predominantly focus on the application of knowledge and skills.
  • A short text/diagram/data/ graphs/cartoons can be provided as a stimulus.
  • Learners will be required to:
  • Explain/examine/analyse/ evaluate/critically discuss a topic
  • Make decisions and give advice
  • Provide recommendations
  • Draw conclusions
  • Solve problems
  • Learners should provide responses through extended writing of descriptive paragraphs or short essays.
  • Mark allocation for subquestions in this section could range between 4–8 marks in total per question.


NOTE: Should learners be required to write a short essay, the structure of the essay would include an introduction, elaboration/body and conclusion, based on the specific key concepts in the question.

2.3 Cognitive levels
The suggested weighting of the cognitive levels for the question paper is as follows:

WEIGHTING  COGNITIVE LEVEL   BLOOM'S TAXONOMY 
 30%  Lower order  Levels 1 & 2
 40%  Middle order  Levels 3 & 4
 30%  Higher order  Levels 5 & 6

 

LEVEL OF DIFFICULTY OF QUESTIONS 
  • In Bloom's taxonomy the same action word/verb, e.g. 'explain', 'describe', 'compare', can be used interchangeably in different cognitive levels
  • The design feature of a question will indicate whether it is a lower-, middle- or higher-order question.
  • It must also be noted that the level of difficulty of a question within each cognitive level may vary from easy to medium or difficult, since it reflects the thinking processes that are required.
    • For example, although 'state' is at the lowest level of Bloom's taxonomy, it may require a deeper understanding and application of knowledge for a specific question and not merely recalling of knowledge.
    • The same may apply to 'evaluate', which is at the highest level of Bloom's taxonomy where the required thinking process may be less complex for one particular question, yet more difficult for the next.

NOTE: Please refer to previous examination papers and marking guidelines for examples.


2.4 Taxonomy of thinking skills
The table below provides the six categories in Bloom's taxonomy, the cognitive demands required, and examples of the action words/verbs associated with it.

LEVELS OF COGNITIVE DEMAND     
   Category  Definition   *Action Words 
Lower Order Knowledge
Level 1 
Ability to recall information, facts, terms and basic concepts previously learned  Tell, recite, list, memorise, select, remember, define, locate, give, match, recall, repeat, state, outline 
Comprehension
Level 2 
Demonstrate a basic understanding of facts and ideas Translate or rephrase into other words; give descriptors Give examples, explain, summarise, show, define, describe, discuss, identify, interpret, infer, compare, contrast, demonstrate, classify, paraphrase
Middle Order   Application
Level 3 
Use information in a new or different situation/way by applying knowledge learned in one situation to another Demonstrate, apply, make use of, guide, chart, arrange, illustrate, locate, construct, solve, plan
Analysis
Level 4 
Examine and break information into parts and understand how parts relate to the whole.
Understand motives or causes
Investigate, classify, categorise, compare, solve, relate, research, contrast, distinguish, report on, sort, debate
Higher Order   Evaluation
Level 5 
Judge the value of something regarding criteria and support judgement
Present and defend opinions by making judgements about information, validity of ideas or the quality of something 
Judge, evaluate, give opinion or point of view, prioritise, recommend, critique, discuss, compare, defend, assess, validate, explain, decide, estimate, predict, rate, select, support, justify, argue, conclude, why do you think
Create/
Synthesis
Level 6
Reform individual parts to make a new whole Design, create, plan, recommend, hypothesis, construct, forecast, rearrange parts, imagine, generate, compose, improve, predict, formulate, devise, examine, investigate, develop

*Some action words are interchangeable, depending on the nature of the question.

3. DEPTH/SCOPE OF CONTENT
The depth of content refers to the extent to which a topic is focused upon and explored. It helps to enhance the depth of learning as learners develop their content knowledge. It also assists in connecting the relevant content to a learner's real-life experiences.
The following EXAMPLES could be used as a guideline when dealing with the depth of content:

*Definition of concepts  Causes  Consequences 
 Impact Effect  Value
 Importance Aims  Reasons
 Factors Solutions  Practical strategies
 Result/Outcomes Motive   Evidence
 Benefits Predict  Distinguish
 Compare Actions Conclusion
 Disapprove Projecting  Functions
 Difference Priorities Choices
 Advise Interventions Approve
 Similarities Connection between Decisions

EXAMPLES:
Class discussions on a topic and subtopic, such as 'Human factors causing ill health: contributing factors: unhealthy sexual behaviour' would include, e.g.:

  1. The definition of each key concept, e.g. ill health, unsafe sexual behaviour.
  2. Discuss reasons why this type of behaviour is still prevalent among the youth.
  3. Assess the negative effects of unsafe sexual behaviour on the life of a young person.

*NOTE:

  • Conceptual learning is considered to be the foundational underpinning knowledge that learners need in order to foster a deeper understanding and knowledge of subject content, so that they may be better able to transfer and apply what they have learnt to new situations.
  • Teachers should refer to the 2017–2020 examination papers and marking guidelines for more examples and guidance AND use these papers and marking guidelines as a teaching tool to mediate content more effectively.

4. MARK ALLOCATION

  • It is important to study the mark allocation in brackets before answering a question, in order to determine how marks will be applied.
  • The mark allocation is also an indication of the format, depth and length of answer required:

mark allocation

5. CONTENT AND CONTEXT GUIDELINES
The overview of topics below is provided in the Curriculum and Assessment Policy Statement (CAPS) to assist teachers with preparing learners with the core knowledge and concepts required for the Grade 12 Common Assessment Task. Also refer to the Annual Teaching Plan (ATP) for ALL topics, subtopics and content to be covered per term.

TOPIC  GRADE 12 
1. Development of the self in society
  • Life skills required to adapt to change as part of ongoing healthy lifestyle choices
  • Stress management
  • Conflict resolution
  • Human factors that cause ill health
  • Action plan for lifelong participation in physical activity
2. Social and environmental responsibility
  • Environments and services which promote safe and healthy living
  • Responsibilities of various levels of government
  • A personal mission statement for life
3. Democracy and human rights
  • Responsible citizenship
  • The role of the media in a democratic society
  • Ideologies, beliefs and worldviews on construction of recreation and physical activity across cultures and genders
4. Careers and career choices
  • Commitment to a decision taken: locate appropriate work or study opportunities in various sources
  • Reasons for and impact of unemployment and innovative solutions to counteract unemployment
  • Core elements of a job contract
  • Refinement of portfolio of plans for life after school
5. Study skills
  • Reflection on own study and examination writing skills
  • Importance of school-based assessment/obtaining the NSC
  • Strategies to follow in order to succeed in Grade 12
6. Physical Education
  • Achievement of own personal fitness and health goals
  • Long-term engagement in traditional and/or non-traditional sport or playground and/or community and/or indigenous games or relaxation and recreational activities
  • Safety issues

*NOTE: Physical Education may be conducted for half an hour per week or for one hour fortnightly, depending on the timetable of the school and will be formally assessed in Grade 12 in Terms 1 and 2.


6. RESOURCES

  • The first and most important resource to be used for the planning and teaching of Life Orientation content is the CAPS document, in conjunction with the revised Grade 12 Annual Teaching Plan and Programme of Assessment.
  • Textbooks: Teachers are encouraged to use the DBE-approved textbooks that comply with the requirements of the CAPS for Life Orientation (2011).
  • Due to the aims and nature of Life Orientation, it is important to note that a textbook is only ONE of many resources to be used when mediating the subject content in the classroom.
  • Teachers should therefore infuse contemporary real-life issues into Life Orientation content by also using the internet, current newspaper articles and magazines, and other relevant resources, in the teaching of the subject.

7. MARKING GUIDELINES

  • The marker should read the question paper carefully and underline/circle key instructions in questions before marking.
  • Strictly follow the marking guideline and give credit to learners who provide well-reasoned, qualified arguments and statements that answer the particular question, and link to the possible responses in the marking guidelines.
  • When awarding marks in SECTIONS B and C, learners must answer in full sentences.
  • Within the 3- or 4-mark questions, learners could and should be awarded 4, 3, 2 and 1 or 0 marks(s) depending on the level of answers given.
  • In all responses produced by the learners, distinction should be made between excellent, good, satisfactory and poor answers.
  • A tick (✓) must be placed at the fact that it is being awarded in order to prevent global marking.
  • A tick (✓) equals one mark.
  • Marks for subsections must be totalled on the right-hand side of the answer sheet.
  • Marks for each section must be totalled on the left-hand side of the answer sheet and circled.
  • The total mark for each section must be transferred to the end of the learner's script and totalled, e.g.:
    A 18
    B 30
    C 30
    Total = 78
  • The final total for the question paper must be transferred to the front of the cover page.
  • The teachers responsible for marking or moderation of scripts must sign and date each marked script, since the marker and moderator are accountable for enquiries regarding the outcome of marks awarded.
    Example of marks transferred to the cover page:
    Name of learner: John Doe
     78 
    100
  • Marking of the Final NSC Life Orientation CAT Examination should be done at a centralised venue.

8. CONCLUSION
This Examination Guidelines document is meant to articulate the assessment aspirations espoused in the CAPS document. It is therefore not a substitute for the CAPS document which teachers should teach to.
Qualitative curriculum coverage as enunciated in the CAPS cannot be over-emphasised.

Last modified on Thursday, 24 June 2021 09:40