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CONSUMER STUDIES GRADE 12 - EXAMINATION GUIDELINES 2021

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CONSUMER STUDIES
EXAMINATION GUIDELINES
GRADE 12
2021

TABLE OF CONTENTS  Page 
1. INTRODUCTION  3
2. ASSESSMENT IN GRADE 12
2.1 Instructions and Information
2.2 Structure of the question paper
2.3 Cognitive levels
2.4 Cognitive demands
2.5 Format of the question paper 
4
4
4
5
5
5
3. PREPARATION FOR THE EXAMINATIONS 6
4. 2021 NATIONAL RECOVERY ANNUAL TEACHING PLAN (ATP)
(2021–2023 Nutritional and Food-related Health Conditions)
7
5.TYPES OF QUESTIONS 8
6. SUBJECT CONTENT PER QUESTION
6.1 SECTION A: QUESTION 1: Short questions (all topics)
6.2 SECTION B: QUESTION 2: The Consumer
6.3 QUESTION 3: Food and Nutrition
6.4 QUESTION 4: Clothing
6.5 QUESTION 5: Housing and Interior
6.6 QUESTION 6: Entrepreneurship 

11
11
11
13
14
15
16

7. GENERAL GUIDELINES FOR MARKERS  17
8. APPROVED TEXTBOOKS 18
9. CONCLUSION 18

1. INTRODUCTION
The Curriculum and Assessment Policy Statement (CAPS) for Engineering Graphics and Design outlines the nature and purpose of the subject Engineering Graphics and Design. This guides the philosophy underlying the teaching and assessment of the subject in Grade 12.
The purpose of these Examination Guidelines is to:

  • Provide clarity on the depth and scope of the content to be assessed in the Grade 12 National Senior Certificate (NSC) Examination in Engineering Graphics and Design.
  • Assist teachers to adequately prepare learners for the NSC examinations.

This document deals with the final Grade 12 external examinations. It does not deal in any depth with the School-based Assessment (SBA), Performance Assessment Tasks (PATs) or final external practical examinations as these are clarified in a separate PAT document which is updated annually.
These Examination Guidelines should be read in conjunction with:

  • The National Curriculum Statement (NCS) Curriculum and Assessment Policy Statement (CAPS): Engineering Graphics and Design
  • The National Protocol of Assessment: An addendum to the policy document, the National Senior Certificate: A qualification at Level 4 on the National Qualifications Framework (NQF), regarding the National Protocol for Assessment (Grades R–12)
  • The national policy pertaining to the programme and promotion requirements of the National Curriculum Statement, Grades R–12
  • The Abridged Section 4 of the Grade 12 CAPS Amendments.
  • The new National Recovery Teaching Plan (ATP) for 2021 to 2023

2. ASSESSMENT IN GRADE 12
2.1 Instructions and Information
The following instructions and information always appear on page two of the examination question paper. Learners must be made aware of it as they do not always adhere to these instructions and information:
The question paper consists of SIX questions.

QUESTION  CONTENT  MARKS WEIGHTING  
SECTION A
 1 Short Questions (all topics)   40  20%
SECTION B   
 2 The Consumer   40  20%
 3 Food and Nutrition   40  20%
 4 Clothing   20  10%
 5 Housing and Interior   20  10%
 6 Entrepreneurship  40 20%
TOTAL  200 100%
  1. ALL questions are COMPULSORY and must be answered in the ANSWER BOOK.
  2. Number the questions according to the numbering system used in the question paper.
  3. Start EACH question on a NEW page.
  4. You may use a pocket calculator.
  5. Write only in black or blue ink.
  6. Pay attention to spelling and sentence construction.
  7. Write neatly and legibly.

2.2 Structure of the Question Paper
(Abridged Section 4 of the GRADE 12 CAPS amendments page 43)

  • The Consumer Studies examination consists of one 3-hour question paper of 200 marks.
  • There are SIX COMPULSORY questions, covering all the topics in Sections A and B of the question paper.
  • Questions will be set using: case studies, scenarios, cartoons, graphs, pictures, labels, recipes, menus and other sources, where applicable.
QUESTION  CONTENT  MARKS WEIGHTING  
SECTION A
QUESTION 1 Short Questions (all topics)
COMPULSORY: Include a variety of short question types
 40  20%
SECTION B   
QUESTION 2 The Consumer   40  20%
QUESTION 3 Food and Nutrition   40  20%
QUESTION  4 Clothing   20  10%
QUESTION 5 Housing and Interior   20  10%
QUESTION 6 Entrepreneurship  40  20%
TOTAL  200 100%

2.3 Cognitive Levels
The question paper caters for a range of cognitive levels and different levels of Difficulty. The Abridged Section 4 of the CAPS Amendments page 44 provides a breakdown of the different cognitive levels of questions.

COGNITIVE LEVEL  MARKS   WEIGHTING 
Lower order: Remembering  60 30%
Middle order: Understanding 20%
Applying 30% 
100
(40 + 60)
50%
Higher order: Analysing, Evaluating, Creating  40 20% 
TOTAL  200  100%

2.4 Cognitive Demands
The cognitive levels refer to the kind and level of thinking or reasoning of information, required to successfully respond to the instruction of a question or task. Assessment in Consumer Studies must cater for a well-balanced range of cognitive levels and learner abilities.
When setting the question paper, an analysis is done simultaneously to ensure the paper is weighted accurately, according to the Abridged Section 4 of the CAPS Amendments (page 44).

LEVELS OF DIFFICULTY MARKS   WEIGHTING 
Easy 60 30%
Moderate 100 50%
Difficult 40 20% 
TOTAL  200  100%

The spread of the cognitive levels and the levels of difficulty is balanced PER QUESTION as well as the question paper as a whole.
Cognitive Levels: Exemplar Guidelines per Question

Cognitive Levels   Cognitive Demands Levels of difficulty  Weighting  Questions with a total of 40 marks  Questions with a Total of 20 marks 
Lower order: Remembering   Easy, moderate, difficult  30% 12 marks 6 marks
Middle order: Understanding 20% Applying 30%   Easy, moderate, difficult  50% 8 marks
12 marks
10 marks
Higher order: Analysing, Evaluating, Creating   Easy, moderate, difficult  20% 8 marks 4 marks
 TOTAL    100% 40 marks 20 marks

2.5 Format of Question Paper
NO SEPARATE answer sheet will be provided for QUESTION 1 (Short Questions).
ALL questions are to be answered in the NATIONAL ANSWER BOOK provided to each candidate.
3. PREPARATION FOR THE EXAMINATIONS
Grade 12 content will be assessed, but prior foundational knowledge from Grades 10 and 11 may be necessary to interpret or answer some of the questions.
On the day of the examinations candidates should:

  • Be in the examination room 1 hour before the starting time to settle in and make maximum use of the reading time before attempting to answer any questions.
  • Bring a calculator, pen, pencil, eraser and ruler.
  • Manage their time well, as illustrated in the table that follows, in order to complete the question paper in the allocated time.

The following guideline is applied to manage time effectively.

QUESTION  CONTENT  MARK ALLOCATION TIME  
SECTION A
 1 Short Questions (all topics)
COMPULSORY: Include a variety of short question types
 40 20 minutes
SECTION B   
 2 The Consumer   40 40 minutes
 3 Food and Nutrition   40 40 minutes
 4 Clothing   20 20 minutes
 5 Housing and Interior   20 20 minutes
 6 Entrepreneurship  40 40 minutes
TOTAL  200 180 minutes
  • Read through the question paper carefully. Highlight the key words to breakdown the question to ensure that all aspects of the question are included in the response.
  • Jot down any thoughts/words which come to mind that relate to the topic in the question. These thoughts/words can be useful memory triggers when questions are answered.
  • Read all the instructions carefully. Candidates should be prepared to interpret resources that accompany a question that they have not seen never seen before. The skill to apply their knowledge must be practised to allow the candidate to apply knowledge to different types of questions.
  • Study and interrogate each resource, e.g. a cartoon, graph, table, an illustration or picture carefully to determine the link between the content/topic and the resource.
  • Write neatly and legibly with a blue or black pen. Marks will be lost if the writing is not clear. markers cannot read the handwriting.
  • Avoid slang or SMS language to ensure your answer is understood clearly.
  • Start each question on a new page and draw a line after completing each question. This enables the marker to see where each question starts and ends and minimises the chances of markers making mistakes.
  • Leave time at the end of the question paper to read through and review answers and correct any mistakes or complete answers that were left out.

4. 2021–2023 NATIONAL RECOVERY ANNUAL TEACHING PLAN (ATP)
Food and Nutrition: Nutritional and Food-related Health Conditions

TERM 2
Topics to be studied
Specific topics are assigned to each academic year for the Recovery ATP in 2021; 2022 and 2023.

Content to be covered in 2021 -2023      

Term/ Week CAPS Ref   Topic  2021 2022 2023
Term 2
Week 4
Week 5
34 Food and NutritionNutrition Nutritional and food-related health conditions
  • Short description, causes, prevention and management
  • Focus on nutrition and eating habits to prevent or manage an existing condition.

Nutritional and food-related health conditions

  • Short description, causes, prevention and management
  • Focus on nutrition and eating habits to prevent or manage an existing condition.

Nutritional and food-related health conditions

  • Short description, causes, prevention and management
  • Focus on nutrition and eating habits to prevent or manage an existing condition.
Term 2
Week 4
34 Food and NutritionNutrition
  • Glycaemic index (GI) of food
  • Low/high blood glucose levels.
  • Diabetes
  • Coronary heart disease, including high blood cholesterol, leading to atherosclerosis
  • High blood pressure
  • Food allergies.
  • Dairy and gluten intolerance.
Term 2
Week 5 
34 Food and NutritionNutrition Osteoporosis, Anaemia Eating disorders:
  • Anorexia,
  • BulimiaBulimia
  • ObesityObesity


5. TYPES OF QUESTIONS
SECTION A
QUESTION 1: SHORT QUESTIONS
All questions are answered in the NATIONAL ANSWER BOOK provided to each learner. Question 1 includes questions from all the prescribed content topics.
QUESTION 1.1: MULTIPLE-CHOICE QUESTIONS
1.1.1 Various options are provided as possible answers to the following questions. Choose the correct answer and write only the letter (A–D) next to the appropriate question numbers (1.1.1 to 1.1.20) in the ANSWER BOOK, e.g. 1.1.21 C.
This type of question tests the candidates' knowledge of detail, facts and interrelatedness between content/topics.
Candidates should:

  • First cover the answers while reading the question. Give the answer before looking at the options provided.
  • Circle words like always, never, only, but and except.
  • Cross out definite incorrect options.

A combination of options could be required, which could count more than one mark.

QUESTION 1.2: MATCHING ITEMS
An item in COLUMN B is matched with an item in COLUMN A. Only the corresponding letter is written next to the question number.
First read through the column on the right that contains the answers. Study the column on the left. Match the items with the definition/term/statement. Three columns could also be included for matching.

QUESTION 1.3: IDENTIFICATION ITEMS
Select/Choose the correct answers (statements/terms/words) from the list given. Write only the letters (A–J) next to the question number (1.3) in the ANSWER BOOK.
Only the selected correct answers (A–J) must be written next to the corresponding question number. If a question asks for a specific number of responses, e.g. SIX, only the first SIX responses will be marked. Read the instructions carefully to determine which options are correct.

QUESTION 1.4: GIVE THE CORRECT TERM
Give the correct term for the description. Write only the correct term next to the question number. Read the description carefully to determine the correct term.
NOTE: TRUE/FALSE questions are NOT recommended.

SECTION B
QUESTIONS 2–6
All the questions are answered in the ANSWER BOOK.
These questions that require a shorter or longer answer are included in Questions 2 to 6.
Questions that require a shorter answer
These questions test the ability of the candidate to give a detailed, brief and concise answer. It is important to find the key word and/or phrase to determine what the question instructs for the response. The mark allocation also gives an indication of how much information is required for the answer.
State: Used when the answer is a statement or should be given in a sentence.
Name/List: Used when the answer is one word or consists of lists of items/words.
Give: Used when the answer is a reason or an example.
Longer-answer questions: Questions that require a longer answer
These questions require the candidates to express their own opinions and apply to all the questions 2–6.
These questions start with an action verb that give a clear instruction of what is required for the expected response, e.g. like: 'Give your view on …', 'Explain why …', 'Discuss why …', 'Analyse …' or 'Evaluate …'
The examiners do not only want to test the candidates' knowledge of the subject, but also their ability to understand, interpret, apply and reason, which is why candidates will often be asked to explain/motivate an answer.
Below are examples of action verbs that are used in questions that require a longer answer. Tips are provided that assist to answer these questions.
Compare: Describe both situations and show the differences and similarities between them. This could be answered in table format, e.g.

CRITERIA   GENETICALLY MODIFIED FOOD   ORGANICALLY GROWN FOOD 
1. Description
2. Example 
   

NOTE: If the question requires the candidate to answer the question in a tabled format, the candidates must adhere to the instruction. ONE mark will be deducted if not answered in a table as prescribed.
Define: A simple definition is not enough. The candidate needs to use an appropriate example, diagram or formula to demonstrate and explain the definition of the concept.
Discuss: Consider the argument for and against the concept that is presented in the question. Candidates must present both sides and then reach a definite conclusion.
Describe: List the main characteristics or give an account of something. Candidates may need to do more than just describe the idea in question. They also need to look at the idea critically.
Explain: Interpret, make clear and spell out the meaning of the idea in question. Candidates can use an example to show their understanding of the idea. Give reasons for differences in opinion and try to analyse causes.
Justify: Candidates need to prove or give reasons for decisions or conclusions. A logical argument must be presented.
Outline: Give a summary, using the main points and leaving out the minor details. This is usually required when candidates need to make a list of the steps in an idea. A concise definition of each of these steps is expected.
Analyse: Candidates have to examine the idea in detail and show the essence or structure of the idea.
Evaluate: Candidates have to assess or appraise the idea. Look at positive and negative aspects. Give reasons for conclusions or decisions.
Critically analyse: Candidates need to separate, examine, interpret and critique information.
Create: Candidates will need to use information/data to create/predict or make a projection.
The mark allocation is an indication of how many facts have to be written down. A fact could be requested that is
If the question specifies that the answer must be presented in a paragraph format, and not give an answer in a bulleted format will not be accepted. ONE mark is deducted if an instruction is not adhered to.

6. SUBJECT CONTENT PER QUESTION
6.1 QUESTION 1: SHORT QUESTIONS (ALL TOPICS) (40 marks)
6.2 QUESTION 2: THE CONSUMER (40 marks)
Candidates should be able to:

  • Explain the financial and contractual responsibilities consumers should take note of
  • Identify and describe the different types of taxes
  • Know all the different terms
  • Explain the difference between simple and compound interest (NO calculations)
  • Discuss the interest rates applicable to different types of credit
  • Compare different sources of electricity
  • Evaluate the responsible use of electricity and water
  • Know the responsibility of municipalities with regard to municipal services
  • Evaluate municipal service delivery

Financial and contractual aspects consumers should take note of

  • A contract:
    • Definition of a contract
  • Types of contracts relevant to consumers:
    • Employment contracts
    • Credit contracts
    • Rental and lease contracts
    • Contracts for gym membership and cell phone, Internet and DStv subscriptions
    • Business ownership or partnership contracts
  • A cooling-off period
  • Exemption clauses (legal/illegal)
  • Unfair business practice
  • A warranty and a guarantee:
    • Definitions and differences
  • Grey goods/Parallel imports:
    • Definition
    • Implication for consumers
  • Scams: types of scams consumers should be aware of:
    • Work-from-home
    • Phishing
    • Lottery/Prize notification
  • Stokvel (legal/illegal):
    • How a stokvel works
    • Requirements for a legal stokvel
  • Pyramid schemes (legal/illegal):
    • How a pyramid scheme works
    • Illegal pyramid schemes
    • Legal pyramid schemes (multilevel marketing/tiered-level marketing)

Taxes, interest rates and inflation

  • Types of taxes paid by South Africans, such as income tax, VAT, property taxes, taxes on goods and services (such as petrol, liquor, cigarettes, motor licenses, capital gains tax, environment tax, sugar tax):
    • Why do South Africans pay tax?
    • Whom are taxes paid to: South African Revenue Services (SARS)
    • Short description of the following taxes:
      • Income tax: pay as you earn (PAYE), provisional tax
      • VAT and foods exempted from VAT
      • Property tax (not paid to SARS but to the municipality)
      • Excise duty: taxes levied on liquor and cigarettes
      • Levies paid on petrol and motor licenses
  • Interest rates: applicable to different types of credit:
    • Definition of interest rates
    • Repo rate is the interest rate charged by the Reserve Bank
  • Simple and compound interest (the difference, NO calculations)
  • Inflation: definition, inflation rate, the CPI in South Africa:
    • Inflation: definition
    • Inflation rate: definition
    • Explain what the CPI is and how it is measured
    • The effect of inflation on consumers
  • Include any legal changes/new developments that might occur:
    • The National Credit Act governs the interest rates charged by credit providers.
    • Information on any new developments that might occur in future will be given in the examination question paper and questions will be based on the given information.

Sustainable consumption of electricity

  • Comparison of the main sources of electricity supply such as fossil fuels and regenerative forms such as water, wind and solar
  • Responsible use of electricity related to housing and household equipment and appliances
  • The use of gas in households as a source of energy: advantages, disadvantages and cost

Sustainable consumption of water

  • Water (explain the issue in general, but then focus on households): pollution of water, shortage of water, shortage of fresh, clean water
  • Responsible use of water related to housing and household equipment and appliances

Municipal services

  • The responsibilities of municipalities regarding services and service delivery:
    • Listing and explaining services that municipalities are responsible for
    • Funding of municipal services
  • Responsibilities of communities regarding the use of municipal services

Keep in mind that the responsibility towards the environment (going green) can be infused here.

6.3 QUESTION 3: FOOD AND NUTRITION (40 marks)
Cartoons, tables, graphs, food labels, meal plans, menus or recipes could be used as resources in the questions.
Nutritional and food-related health conditions
Candidates have to focus on eating habits to prevent or manage an existing condition.
Candidates should be able to:

  • Describe a food-related health condition
  • Name the causes of the health-related conditions or identify/explain the cause of the condition after reading an extract/scenario
  • Explain how each condition could be prevented, focusing on nutrition and eating habits
  • Explain how each condition could be managed, focusing on nutrition and eating habits
  • Suggest dietary changes to manage the disease
  • Compare different health conditions, e.g. anorexia with bulimia

Candidates must study the following content:

  • Glycaemic index (GI) of food:
    • Definition of the glycaemic index
    • Difference between high, intermediate and low GI foods
    • The best source of information on the GI of food is the GI Foundation: www.gifoundation.com.
  • A short description, the causes, prevention and management of the food-related health conditions listed below. The focus must be on nutrition and eating habits to prevent or manage an existing condition.
    Food-related health conditions:
    • Low/High blood glucose levels (hypoglycaemia and hyperglycaemia)
    • Diabetes
    • Osteoporosis

Food-borne diseases
Candidates should be able to:

  • Identify and explain transmission possibilities in the food environment
  • List and explain the incubation period of the listed food-borne diseases

Candidates must study the following content:

  • Transmission possibilities in the food environment
  • Incubation period of the following diseases:
    • Hepatitis A (infective jaundice)
    • E-coli infection
    • Gastro-enteritis

Food additives: commercial and domestic use
Candidates must be able to:

  • Explain what food additives are
  • Give reasons for the use of food additives
  • Explain the effect of additives on food
  • Discuss the safety of additives and the (possible) influence on health
  • Discuss the issue of possible allergic reactions of food additives
  • Types of food additives: nutrients, emulsifiers, stabilisers, bleach and colourants, chemical preservatives, anti-oxidants and additives to improve taste

Food labelling
Candidates must be able to:

  • Use food labels as a source of nutritional and other information to select products
  • Know, identify and interpret basic information that must appear on food labels
  • Identify misleading nutrient content claims that appear on food labels
  • State conditions for nutrient content claims for energy, fat, saturated fat, cholesterol, sodium, dietary fibre, proteins, vitamins and minerals
  • Identify whether a nutrient content claim is valid, or not

Food-related consumer issues impacting on the natural and economic environment, including public health
Candidates must be able to:

  • Describe or define genetically modified food, organically grown food and irradiated food
  • Give examples of genetically modified crops and irradiated foods
  • Identify, explain and evaluate the impact of genetically modified food, organically grown food and irradiated food on the natural and economic environment
  • Describe or define food security
  • Discuss the problems regarding food security in South Africa
  • Discuss self-sufficiency, exports and imports of food in South Africa

6.4 QUESTION 4: CLOTHING (20 marks)
Candidates should be able to:

  • Describe the concept fashion.
  • Explain influences that determine contemporary fashion.
  • Identify, explain and describe fashion cycles: fads, classic and standard trends
  • Explain and describe fashion revivals: retrospective fashions
  • Explain why fashion changes
  • Describe contemporary fashion trends for young adults
  • Explain the role of appearance in the world of work
  • Suggest guidelines for choosing and purchasing clothes and accessories
  • Know how to plan a wardrobe for the world of work and different seasons and occasions. A motivation regarding the suitability of an outfit for a certain work environment might be required.
  • Apply clothing theory to select clothing for the world of work
  • Plan a basic wardrobe for the world of work for different seasons and different occasions at work (male and female): factors to consider, including application of colour, design elements and principles.
  • Discuss/Analyse/Evaluate issues regarding the impact of clothing and textiles on the natural and economic environment

Pictures, photographs, graphs, cartoons, case studies or statements may be used as resources. Candidates may have to comment on any given resource and suggest solutions to address problems.
NOTE: The application of colour, the design elements and principles (Grade 11) should be incorporated.

Consumer issues regarding clothing and textiles impacting on the natural and economic environment

  • Eco-fashion and the sustainable use of textiles and clothing:
    • Description of eco-fashion
    • Organic textiles
  • Reduce, reuse, recycle
  • The influence of the piracy of legally protected brand names (trademarks):
    • Ethical clothing practices
    • Explanation of piracy
    • Consequences of piracy

6.5 QUESTION 5: HOUSING AND INTERIOR (20 marks)
Candidates should be able to:

  • Discuss and compare the THREE different housing options (advantages and disadvantages)
  • Explain and discuss the financial responsibilities for the different options
  • Discuss and explain the contractual responsibilities for the different options
  • Explain and discuss the factors to consider when shopping for household appliances
  • Compare and evaluate different appliances and make the choice that would be most suitable for a specific scenario. The following must be kept in mind: functionality, energy, water consumption and possible environmental impact.
  • Explain the financial and contractual responsibilities in buying household equipment
  • Calculate the total cost of instalment sale transactions
  • Identify and explain the rights of consumers and sellers

A statement, case study, scenario, cartoon, picture or advertisement could be given as a resource. Candidates may have to comment on the given resource and/or suggest solutions to the problem.
Different housing acquisition options

  • Renting, building and buying (full title and sectional title):
    • Full title: description, examples, advantages and disadvantages
    • Sectional title: description, examples, advantages and disadvantages, functions of the body corporate, what the levy is used for
  • Advantages and disadvantages of renting, building and buying
  • Financial responsibilities for the three housing options:
    • Renting: paying deposit, rent, household insurance, water, electricity, municipal services
    • Buying and building: bond repayments (if bond is used), rates and taxes, household insurance, homeowners' insurance, water, electricity, municipal services, maintenance
  • Contractual responsibilities for the three housing options:
    • Renting: lease agreement
    • Buying: offer to purchase becomes the sales agreement/deed of sale once signed by the buyer and seller (a contract), mortgage bond (if bond is used)
    • Building: contract with the builder, mortgage bond (if bond is used)

Buying household appliances

  • Factors to consider when shopping for household appliances: needs of the family, budget, easy to operate
  • The choice of the household appliances listed below with regard to functionality, energy consumption (human and non-human, including energy-efficient ratings), water consumption and possible environmental impact
    Household appliances that need to be studied:
    • Washing machine
    • Refrigerator
    • Freezer
    • Stove
    • Microwave oven
  • The financial and contractual responsibilities of buying furniture and household appliances:
    • Explain the following types of transactions: cash, instalment sale transactions, laybys, credit account transactions, bank credit card transactions
  • Candidates must be able to calculate the total cost of instalment sale transactions.
  • Rights and responsibilities of consumers and sellers (this could be linked with all the other topics)

6.6 QUESTION 6: ENTREPRENEURSHIP (40 marks)
Candidates will have to:

  • Identify a potentially profitable business opportunity
  • Explain the factors to consider in the choice of a suitable product for small-scale production
  • Identify, explain or discuss the factors influencing the efficient production of quality products (in general: in terms of food, textiles or soft furnishing – only the option your school has selected)
  • Develop a marketing plan for the production and marketing of a product
  • Analyse and/or evaluate the sustainable profitability of a business
  • Make suggestions how to improve the sustainable profitability of a business
  • Determine the costing for start-up needs, production costs, selling price and profit

A statement, case study, scenario, cartoon, budget, business plan, graph or table could be provided as a resource. Candidates would have to comment on the resource and suggest solutions to solve the problem.
Moving from an idea to producing and marketing a product

  • Identifying a potentially profitable business opportunity (link with Grade 11)
  • The formulation of the idea and specification of the product

Factors to consider in the entrepreneur's choice of a suitable product for small-scale production:

  • The availability of human skills
  • Financial resources
  • Available workspace
  • Available raw materials (locally available)
  • Consumer appeal

Factors influencing the efficient production of quality products:

  • Planning
  • Adhering to specifications
  • Quality control
  • Tidy workspace
  • Hygiene of workers
  • Careful control of finances
  • Stock control

Requirements for quality (end) products:

  • Appropriate for target group
  • Presentation of the product
  • Quality of raw materials used
  • Quality and design of packaging
  • Quality of storing
  • Safety
  • Labelling
  • Efficient use of time
  • Efficient storage procedures
  • Customer relations
  • Maintenance of equipment
  • Training of staff
  • Sustainable production and consumption: responsibilities of consumers and producers
  • Storage and delivery strategies

Developing a marketing plan according to the 5P marketing strategy

  • Product: trade mark/name, image, labels and packaging
  • Promotion/Advertising
  • Price and pricing strategy
  • Place: Where will the product be produced? Where will the point of sale be?
  • People: target group and people doing the marketing
  • Doing a financial feasibility study to determine the sustainable profitability of the enterprise:
    • Information (case study/scenario/graph/table) will be provided and questions will be asked on the provided information
  • Determining production costs, selling price, profit and start-up needs:
    • Some calculations will be included in every examination.
    • The R (rand value) must be indicated in all calculations.
  • Interpreting a 'best sale scenario' and a 'worst sale scenario':
    • Information (case study/scenario/graph/table) will be provided and questions will be asked on the information provided.
  • Interpreting a cash-flow projection (optional)

7. GENERAL GUIDELINES FOR MARKERS

  • No negative marking is not implemented in assessment for Consumer Studies.
  • If one answer is required, but more than one answer is provided, the first answer will be marked, irrespective of which one is correct.
  • If a question asks for a specific number of responses, e.g. SIX, only the first six responses will be marked.
  • If a calculation is required, the mark allocation for each step in the calculation will be clearly indicated in the memorandum/marking guideline. Candidates MUST show all the steps in the calculation.
  • If answers are incorrectly numbered, BUT the sequencing is CORRECT, the candidate's answer will awarded the mark(s).
  • In the case of paragraph type responses, the memorandum/marking guideline will clearly indicate where the marks should be allocated.
  • It could be useful to number the ticks (✓) as it will help with moderation, e.g. (✓1). Candidates often do not use the same responses as those on the memorandum, but the answer could still be correct. A mark must be awarded and the candidate's answer can then be linked with the number of the tick (✓1). This will help the moderator to follow the marker's line of thinking.

8. APPROVED TEXTBOOKS

  • Focus Consumer Studies Grade 12, Van Zyl, Van Wyk, Schubotz, Van der Linde
  • Oxford Successful Consumer Studies Grade 12, Booysen, De Villiers, Schulze, Turley
    Additional resources, e.g. Teacher's Guides can be used when teaching but the examiners will use the APPROVED TEXTBOOKS to source the answers to the questions:

9. CONCLUSION
This Examination Guideline document is meant to articulate the assessment aspirations espoused in the CAPS document. It is therefore not a substitute for the CAPS document which teachers should teach to.
Qualitative curriculum coverage as enunciated in the CAPS cannot be over-emphasised.

Last modified on Friday, 25 June 2021 07:40