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TOURISM GRADE 12 - EXAMINATION GUIDELINES 2021

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TOURISM
EXAMINATION GUIDELINES
GRADE 12
2021

TABLE OF CONTENTS  Page 
1. INTRODUCTION  3
2. ASSESSMENT IN GRADE 12 
2.1 Abridged Section 4 of the CAPS 
2.2 Format of the Grade 12 Tourism question paper 
2.3 Cognitive demand in the question paper 
2.4 Structure of the question paper: Grade 12 Trial and Final NSC Examinations 
4
4
5
5
6
3. ELABORATION OF THE CONTENT FOR GRADE 12 (CAPS)  8
4. THE PRACTICAL ASSESSMENT TASK (PAT)   12
5. CONCLUSION  13
ANNEXURE A: THE TIME ZONE MAP 14
ANNEXURE B: ACTION VERBS: BLOOM'S REVISED TAXONOMY 15
ANNEXURE C: LIST OF TERMS GENERALLY USED WHEN SETTING QUESTIONS 16
ANNEXURE D: LIST OF TEXTBOOKS APPROVED BY THE DBE 16

1. INTRODUCTION
The Curriculum and Assessment Policy Statement (CAPS) for Engineering Graphics and Design outlines the nature and purpose of the subject Engineering Graphics and Design. This guides the philosophy underlying the teaching and assessment of the subject in Grade 12.
The purpose of these Examination Guidelines is to:

  • Provide clarity on the depth and scope of the content to be assessed in the Grade 12 National Senior Certificate (NSC) Examination in Engineering Graphics and Design.
  • Assist teachers to adequately prepare learners for the NSC examinations.

This document deals with the final Grade 12 external examinations. It does not deal in any depth with the School-based Assessment (SBA), Performance Assessment Tasks (PATs) or final external practical examinations as these are clarified in a separate PAT document which is updated annually.
These Examination Guidelines should be read in conjunction with:

  • The National Curriculum Statement (NCS) Curriculum and Assessment Policy Statement (CAPS): Engineering Graphics and Design
  • The National Protocol of Assessment: An addendum to the policy document, the National Senior Certificate: A qualification at Level 4 on the National Qualifications Framework (NQF), regarding the National Protocol for Assessment (Grades R–12)
  • The national policy pertaining to the programme and promotion requirements of the National Curriculum Statement, Grades R–12

2. ASSESSMENT IN GRADE 12
2.1 Abridged Section 4 of the CAPS
Revised school-based assessment (SBA) for 2021–2023
GRADE 12

TOURISM
REVISED SBA WEIGHTING FOR 2021–2023
GRADE 12     
 SBA
TERM 1
SBA
TERM 1
SBA
TERM 1
PROMOTION MARK
TERM 4 
Task 1
March
Control Test
100% 
Task 2
Skills Assessment
Task
100% 

Task 3
Data-handling
Task
25%

Task 4
Trial Examinations
75%

SBA = Term 1, 2 + 3
= 300 ÷ 3 = 100
25%
PAT = 100
25%
November
Examinations 200
50%
 100 100 100 100
  PAT
50 + 50
Marks allocated in Term 4 
   

The formal assessment requirements for Tourism (Grade 12)

  • Four formal theoretical (SBA) assessment tasks must be completed during the school year in Grade 12. This accounts for 25% of the total marks for the end-of-year assessment in Term 4. The four formal theoretical (SBA) assessment tasks are COMPULSORY.

The end-of-year assessment includes two parts:

  • A practical assessment task (PAT) and a written theory paper. Together, these two parts make up the remaining 75% in Grade 12.
  • Together, the three components constitute the end-of-year promotion mark of 100%.
  • In Grade 12, all SBA assessment tasks are internally set, marked and moderated.
  • The end-of-year NSC assessment (75%) in Grade 12 is externally set, marked and moderated.
  • Each task must cater for a balanced range of cognitive levels as well as align to the prescribed range for levels of difficulty.
  • An item and error analysis of learner performance must be completed after marking a formal assessment task. The purpose of the analysis is to expose a lack of knowledge and understanding or poorly developed skills. It further assists to identify the most suitable intervention strategy to improve the level of knowledge and understanding and learner performance.
  • The PAT is assessed internally by the teacher and departmental head responsible for Tourism. It may also be moderated externally by the subject advisor/provincial subject head.

2.2 Format of the Grade 12 Tourism question paper

  • The Tourism examination consists of one 3-hour paper of 200 marks.
  • The question paper is divided into five COMPULSORY sections.
  • The national question paper for Tourism is set using a particular structure. It will be to the advantage of learners to familiarise themselves with the format. It is advised that teachers keep to the format below for all examinations that are set internally.

The table below outlines the structure of the paper.

SECTION  QUESTION  TOPIC  MARKS 
 1  Short Questions (covering all topics)  40
B    2 Map Work and Tour Planning  50 
 3 Foreign Exchange 
C    4 Tourism Attractions  50  
 5 Cultural and Heritage Tourism 
 6 Marketing 
D  7 Tourism Sectors  30
 8 Sustainable and Responsible Tourism
E  9 Domestic, Regional and International Tourism 30
 10 Communication and Customer Care

2.3 Cognitive demand in the question paper
The question paper caters for the different learning abilities of learners with a range of cognitive levels. Learners can expect questions with lower, middle and higher cognitive levels.
In order to adequately prepare learners for the cognitive demand of the final examination paper, it is essential for teachers to align the cognitive demand of all internal formal assessment tasks for Grades 10–12 to the levels stipulated in the CAPS. More complex learning will lead to higher-order thinking. Teachers must ensure that internal formal assessment tasks not only contain the 'know what', but also the 'know how'.
The table below indicates the weighting of the cognitive demand in the paper, as stipulated in the CAPS or Abridged Section 4 amendments.

COGNITIVE LEVELS  % 200 MARKS 
Lower order:
Remembering 
30 60
Middle order:
Understanding
Applying 
50
20
30
100
40
60
Higher order:
Analysing
Evaluating
Creating 
20 40

Teachers and learners must note that there is a relation between the marks allocated to a particular question and the cognitive demand. Question papers are also aligned to the prescribed range for levels of difficulty. Learners should keep this in mind when responding to questions.

LEVELS OF DIFFICULTY  PERCENTAGE 
Easy  30%
Moderate  50%
Difficult 20%

When setting question papers and other formal assessment tasks, both examiners and teachers must complete an analysis grid to ensure that the paper is weighted correctly according to the cognitive levels and levels of difficulty stipulated in the National Curriculum Statement (NCS) Curriculum and Assessment Policy Statement (CAPS): Tourism.
2.4 Structure of the question paper: Grade 12 Trial and final NSC Examinations
In the table below the time allocation is added to assist learners with time management to complete the question paper in time.

SECTION  QUESTION  TOPIC  MARKS  MINUTES
 1  Short Questions (covering all topics)  40 20
B    2 Map Work and Tour Planning  50  50
 3 Foreign Exchange 
C    4 Tourism Attractions  50   50
 5 Cultural and Heritage Tourism 
 6 Marketing 
D  7 Tourism Sectors  30 30
 8 Sustainable and Responsible Tourism
E  9 Domestic, Regional and International Tourism 30 30
 10 Communication and Customer Care
  200 180

Teachers must keep abreast with the latest developments and current trends in the tourism industry when setting both informal and formal assessment tasks. Encourage learners to develop a glossary of words/terms that are related to each of the topics above.
Note the following:

  • All questions are COMPULSORY.
  • Learners must be encouraged to read through the question paper carefully before they start writing.
  • Application of the content is one of the skills required in answering the Tourism question paper.
  • When learners are allowed to start writing, they should write down any thoughts or ideas that come to mind on certain questions at the back of the ANSWER BOOK. Writing down ideas can be useful to trigger the memory when the actual questions have to be answered.
  • Read all the headings and instructions carefully. Learners should engage with resources, such as case studies, extracts, graphs, maps, cartoons, pictures, flow charts, infographics, currency rate tables and word clouds. Study the resources and the questions: 'What is this about?; What is it telling me?; What part of my knowledge does it relate to?'
  • Learners should be taught to consider the mark allocation when determining the length of their responses.
  • Learners must be encouraged to use tourism terms and concepts in their responses.
  • Answer in full sentences, unless otherwise indicated.
  • Learners must be encouraged to leave time at the end of the examination to reflect on their responses.
  • Neat, legible handwriting is essential. Correcting poor expression, spelling and checking calculations will be to their advantage.
  • No marks will be awarded for only stating 'yes/no'; marks will be awarded for the motivation/substantiation of the response.
  • The Grade 12 Tourism question paper is the final examination of the three-year FET phase and content covered in Grades 10 and 11 is used to examine the depth of learning in this phase.

SECTION A: SHORT QUESTIONS
This section will contain short questions, such as multiple-choice questions, matching items (COLUMN A/COLUMN B), choose the correct word from the options given, give the correct term, map work, graphs, mind maps, pictures, tourism logos, cartoons, infographics and word clouds. Know the tourism terminology and abbreviations/acronyms well; they may be assessed in this section. There are no TRUE/FALSE questions.
Learners should be made aware that, contrary to popular belief, this section cannot necessarily be considered the 'easy' part of the paper. Questions which at first glance appear simple, may require careful consideration. Consider the distractors carefully in the multiple-choice questions.
All topics and subtopics in the Grade 12 CAPS may be assessed in this section, however, Grade 10 and 11 content, which is considered to be foundational, underpinning knowledge may be included here. Questions could also be structured to cover the various levels of cognitive demand.
SECTIONS B, C, D and E
These sections assess individual topics in more depth and will generally require more comprehensive and, in some cases, more in-depth responses from learners.
In these sections questions may be based on sources, such as maps, graphs, tables, pictures, logos, flow diagrams, extracts, case studies, cartoons, infographics and word cloud. It will be to learners' advantage if they are exposed to these sources from Grade 10 in both formal and informal assessment tasks.
The paper will not only assess the learners' knowledge of the content in the topics, but also their ability to demonstrate more complex understanding and problem-solving skills. Learners may be asked to explain, motivate, substantiate, interpret, apply, reason and calculate. Learners must be alerted to SHOW ALL STEPS for the calculations and rounding off answers to TWO decimal places in Forex calculations.
Questions may start with 'Give your views on …'; 'Explain why …'; 'Discuss how …'; 'Comment on …'; 'Suggest …'; 'Analyse …'; 'Evaluate …'; 'Do you agree …'; 'Recommend' …; 'Justify/Motivate/Substantiate …'; 'In your opinion …,'; 'Argue for or against …'; etc. These questions require higher-order thinking skills and learners have to think critically and creatively or solve problems.
These sections will also include questions that require paragraph-type responses. It is recommended that learners be trained to write paragraph-type answers.

3. ELABORATION OF THE CONTENT FOR GRADE 12 (CAPS)
An elaboration is given below of the content and contexts to be included in the assessment of the topics for Tourism. This section must be read in conjunction with the Tourism CAPS (Sections 3 and 4) as well as the Abridged Section 4 (Grade 12 CAPS Amendments for Tourism – 2021).

SECTION A: SHORT QUESTIONS  40 marks 
QUESTION 1
Questions in this section will assess content on knowledge, comprehension and application.
 

 

SECTION B: (TWO questions)  50 marks
 Learners will need a non-programmable calculator for this section. 
QUESTION 2: MAP WORK AND TOUR PLANNING
Learners can expect questions on:
Tour plans and route planning, compiling a day-by-day itinerary, compiling a tour budget, health, safety, travel documentation, world time zones and calculation of world times when travelling between countries.
General comments:
The time zone map (ANNEXURE C) provided with these guidelines should be used for the interpretation and the understanding of time zones.
Learners are not required to know which countries apply daylight saving time (DST), however, from the given scenario/table they must be able to determine whether to apply DST or not. They must understand the impact of time zones and DST on travel planning and travelling.
Learners must show all calculations. Marks will be allocated for each step used in the calculations. It is advised that learners familiarise themselves with the format of the time zone calculations in the marking guidelines of past question papers.
Learners must be familiar with airline terminology, such as stopover time; lay-over time and +1, which refers to the next day on an airline schedule.
Learners must be exposed to current global health issues that would affect travel to the destination. Know the recommended steps/precautions that are taken with the most recent outbreaks of diseases.
In general, health and safety precautions for tourists in terms of unforeseen occurrences must be discussed using current information.
Learners must be familiar with latest documentation required to access travel documents, custom requirements and the impact these have on international inbound and outbound travel.  

QUESTION 3: FOREIGN EXCHANGE
Learners can expect questions on:
Foreign exchange
General comments: The impact of currency fluctuation on travel. Use only exchange rates expressed as 1 unit of foreign currency = value in rand, i.e. 1USD = R13,50. Calculators may be used for the calculations. All calculations must be rounded off to TWO decimals, e.g. R74,56.
Learners must show all calculations. Learners must know when to use the bank buying rate (BBR) and bank selling rate (BSR) when doing the calculations. Learners must be able to use and interpret a currency rate table to answer questions on Forex.

  • Understand the reasons for the fluctuation of the rand against major currencies.
  • Know the reasons for the fluctuations in exchange rates and the impact this has on international inbound and outbound travel.

 

SECTION C (THREE questions)   50 marks 
QUESTION 4: TOURISM ATTRACTIONS
Learners can expect questions on:
International world icons and attractions listed below, aligned with the 2021 National Recovery Annual Teaching Plan: Tourism Grade 12   
 The following icons have to be studied over the 2021–2023 period:  
2021 2022  2023
Australia: Sydney Opera House*, Ayers Rock/Uluru-Kata Tjuta National Park*  Israel: The Dome of the Rock, the Wailing Wall  Peru: Machu Picchu* (Cuzco) 
Brazil: The Statue of Christ the Redeemer or Corcovado
(Rio de Janeiro) 
Greece: The Parthenon (Athens)  Poland: Auschwitz*
Canada: Niagara Falls  India: The Taj Mahal* (Agra)  Portugal: The Algarve
Italy: Colosseum (Rome)*, Leaning Tower of Pisa (Piazza del uomo)*, Venice*, Vatican City  Turkey: Blue Mosque (Istanbul) Spain: Alcázar of Segovia, bullfights 
Egypt: The Great Pyramids of Giza*, the Sphinx France: The Eiffel Tower,
the French Riviera
Thailand: Floating markets
Germany: Berlin Wall, Black Forest Japan: Mount Fuji Russia: The Kremlin*, the Red Square* (Moscow)
China: The Great Wall of China* Mexico: Chichen Itza (Yucatan)* United Kingdom: Big Ben* (Palace of Westminster*), Buckingham Palace, Tower of London*, Tower Bridge
  Jordan: Petra*
Nepal: Mount Everest
Saudi Arabia: Mecca
Switzerland: The Swiss Alps (Jungfrau-Aletsch)*
Netherlands: Windmills
United States of America: The Statue of Liberty* (New York), the Grand Canyon* (Arizona)
13 icons 14 icons 14 icons
*Indicates that the world icon and attractions are World Heritage Sites (WHS)

 

General comments:
Learners are required to distinguish between an attraction and an icon and to interpret and evaluate the latest statistics presented in the form of graphs, texts and tables. Learners can expect to be assessed on the location of icons/attractions on a world map (country, city/town/area), reason(s) why it is an icon/attraction and a unique characteristic that makes it an icon/attraction.
From case studies; scenarios, extracts etc., learners must be able to link/apply their knowledge to the factors and characteristics that contribute to a successful tourist attraction or icon.
Teachers must ensure that learners are exposed to visuals of icons/attractions in addition to the theoretical facts, as required by the CAPS. 
QUESTION 5: CULTURE AND HERITAGE TOURISM
Learners can expect questions on:
World Heritage Sites
General comments:
Using the latest information, learners must be able (amongst others) to give a description of all the World Heritage Sites (WHS) in South Africa, their locations on a map of South Africa and how they meet UNESCO's criteria. They have to be able to recognise the logo and know the main function and role of UNESCO regarding the World Heritage Sites. Learners should also be able to evaluate the status of World Heritage Sites. Teachers must ensure that the latest, updated information on the World Heritage Sites in South Africa is taught. 
QUESTION 6: MARKETING

Learners can expect questions on:
Marketing South Africa as a tourism destination
South African Tourism's (SATourism) role in marketing South Africa
General comments:
Learners should understand the concepts, core markets and emerging markets, and also how they relate to marketing South Africa as a tourism destination.
Learners should familiarise themselves with:

  • SATourism brand image and core business
  • Funding for marketing purpose – role of TOMSA and TBCSA
  • Various platforms South Africa markets itself as a destination of choice, namely travel tradeshows WTM/ITB/Africa's Travel Indaba and the Getaway Show.

 

SECTION D: (TWO questions)  30 marks
QUESTION 7: TOURISM SECTORS
Learners can expect questions on:
Professional image in the tourism industry, conditions of employment and the purpose and value of a code of conduct
General comments:
Examiners may use a variety of sources and learners will be required to interpret and apply the information. Learners are not required to memorise any legislation. 
QUESTION 8: SUSTAINABLE AND RESPONSIBLE TOURISM
Learners can expect questions on:
The three pillars of sustainable tourism, corporate social investment (CSI) in tourism, responsible tourism and tourists
General comments:
The topic of the three pillars of sustainable tourism is challenging. It is therefore crucial that the groundwork, i.e. all the terminology and concepts associated with this section taught in Grade 10, be revised and reinforced thoroughly. Learners have to demonstrate understanding of the concept and background of the triple bottom-line approach.
Learners will be expected to apply their knowledge to various given sources, make recommendations and provide solutions on how to implement the triple bottom line in a tourism business.
Learners must be able to critically evaluate and assess the role of corporate social investment (CSI) practised by businesses and organisations.
Teachers should use examples of company initiatives from the internet and printed media. Sources of information on responsible tourism, e.g. Responsible Tourism Handbook, FTT website, Gauteng Responsible Tourism Handbook, etc. 

 

SECTION E: (TWO questions)  30 marks 
QUESTION 9: DOMESTIC, REGIONAL AND INTERNATIONAL TOURISM
Learners can expect questions on:
Global events of international significance, political situations and unforeseen occurrences of international significance, forms of payment when travelling internationally, foreign market share and statistics regarding inbound international tourism
General comments:
Learners are not required to study the events, only examples of global events of international significance are required. Learners should be able to deduce the impact these events have on tourism (domestic, regional and international). Current information and most recent events should be accessed from the media.
Learners are not required to study the political situations and unforeseen occurrences. Focus on the impact these situations and occurrences have on international tourism and the economy of the affected country. It is important to make sure learners are aware of recent examples.
Foreign market share and statistics: Learners have to know key concepts, such as inbound tourists; foreign market share; core markets; new markets; existing markets; source markets; tourist arrivals and emerging markets.
When assessing tourism arrival statistics to determine foreign market share, learners may be expected to interpret graphs and statistical information on countries of origin, types of tourists and their interests. Resources: the internet; Statistics South Africa; South African Tourism (annual tourism reports); travel journals and magazines and provincial tourism authorities.  
QUESTION 10: COMMUNICATION AND CUSTOMER CARE
Learners can expect questions on:
Methods to obtain customer feedback and to measure customer satisfaction
General comments:
Learners may be required to interpret and apply information from extracts, pictures, cartoons, etc.
Teachers are encouraged to use the DBE approved textbooks that comply with the requirements of the CAPS for Tourism. Refer to the list of approved textbooks on ANNEXURE D.
The tourism industry is a dynamic, constantly evolving industry. Teachers must keep abreast of the latest developments and trends in the tourism industry as questions on developments and trends may appear in the question paper.

 

4. THE PRACTICAL ASSESSMENT TASK (PAT)
The practical assessment task is a compulsory component of the subject Tourism and contributes to the final promotion mark.
4.1 Setting of the PAT

  • The PAT for Grade 12 will be externally set and moderated every year.
  • The PAT assesses the practical skill sets of the subject.
  • The PAT is set to include application of skills that progress from basic to more advanced skills.
  • Foundational content and skills from Grades 10 and 11 may be assessed in the Grade 12 PAT.
  • The Grade 12 PAT package includes PATs 1 & 2 (including the assessment instruments) and a resource pack for learners.
  • Instructional information on mediation and implementation is included in the Teacher Guidelines.

4.2 Structure and implementation
The PAT package consists of TWO parts:
Part 1 (For teachers): The Teacher Guidelines (for mediation and information)

  For use by:  Content  Timeframe  Implementation 
Part 1 Teachers Teacher Guidelines: Mediation and information Prior to the PAT session Understand and become familiar with the Teacher Guidelines in preparation for the PAT session


Part 2 (For learners): The PAT, the assessment instrument and the PAT resource pack

  For use by: Content  Timeframe  Implementation 
DAY 1   
Part 2    Learners 

1. PAT for Day 1  Day 1 of the PAT:
(2 hours*) + (2 hours) = 4 hours
*NOTE: A break at the discretion of the school 

DAY 1
Learners receive:
PAT for Day 1 and the resource pack in the venue(s).
Learners submit:

  • ANSWER BOOK
  • PAT for Day 1
  • Resource pack
 
2. Official PAT resource pack  
DAY 2 
3. PAT for Day 2 Day 2 of the PAT
(2 hours*) +(2 hours) = 4 hours
*NOTE: A break at the discretion of the school

DAY 2
Learners receive:
PAT for Day 2 and resource pack in the examination venue(s).
Learners submit:

  • ANSWER BOOK
  • PAT for Day 2
  • Resource booklet
4. Official PAT resource pack


4.3 Administration

  • The PAT must be administered under controlled examination conditions.
  • The PAT will be conducted in an 8-hour session, broken down into two 4-hour sessions. The two 4-hour sessions must be scheduled over two consecutive days. Break times are to be implemented at the discretion of the school.
  • Both sessions must take place on consecutive days. These dates will be set by the DBE.
  • Provinces and schools may not change or retype this task or use the task of the previous year.
  • All PATs must be handwritten, with the exception of learners who have applied for a concession.
  • Only resources and addenda provided in the official PAT must be used.
  • Candidates not attending the PAT sessions with or without a valid reason will be dealt with in accordance to the National Protocol for Assessment (NPA) paragraphs 4B(f)(ii), 6(4)(a)(ii), 8(1), 8(4), 8(5), 8(6), 8(7), 9(2), 10(3), 14(1)(b),14(1)(d),14(1)(e) and the National Policy Pertaining to the Programme and Promotion Requirements (NPPPR) paragraph 29(1).

4.4 Marking and moderation

  • The PAT is marked by the teacher and moderated by the departmental head/subject head responsible for Tourism. It is also moderated externally by the subject advisor/provincial subject head. This process is verified externally by DBE/Umalusi.
  • The learners' PATs are moderated at all levels of moderation: School/District/Provincial.
  • Only the moderation instrument provided in the PAT Teacher Guidelines must be used for all levels of moderation to ensure credibility of the moderation process.
  • The standard of the learner PAT will be determined and approved by the subject advisor/ provincial subject head for final submission of the marks.

5. CONCLUSION
This Examination Guidelines document is meant to articulate the assessment aspirations espoused in the CAPS document and the Abridged Section 4 (Grade 12 CAPS Amendments for Tourism) 2021. It is therefore not a substitute for the CAPS document which educators should teach to.
Qualitative curriculum coverage as enunciated in the CAPS cannot be over-emphasised.
ANNEXURE A
THE TIME ZONE MAP (used in the NSC question paper)
annex
ANNEXURE B
ACTION VERBS: BLOOM'S REVISED TAXONOMY

  COGNITIVE LEVELS  ABILITIES 
Remembering (shallow processing: drawing out factual answers, testing recall and recognition) Recalling of facts, concepts, generalisation, terminology, names, etc.
 2 Understanding (translating, interpreting and extrapolating) The ability to interpret factual knowledge and to translate, re-order and re-arrange learned material 
 3  Applying (knowing when to apply; why to apply and recognising patterns of transfer to situations that are new, unfamiliar or have a new slant for learners) The ability to apply existing knowledge to new or similar problems in order to solve them
 4 Analysing (breaking down into parts, forms) The ability to break down and identify elements of an organised whole or structured situation
 5 Evaluating
(according to some set of criteria, and state why)
The ability to make judgments about the value and accuracy of presented material against established criteria
 6 Creating
(combining elements into a pattern clearly not there before)
The ability to design, debate, decision-making situations

 

LEVEL  THINKING SKILL REQUIRED  ACTION VERB
NOTE: Action verbs are determined by the cognitive level of the question. 
 1 KNOWING terminology, definitions, formulae, sequences, trends, methods, theories, causes, etc.  Name
Describe
Indicate
State
Identify
Choose
 2 UNDERSTANDING reflected by interpretation, conversion, extrapolation, etc.  Explain/Clarify
Give
Compare
Define
Distinguish/Differentiate
Predict
 3 APPLYING of principles, methods, theories. etc. mastered previously Identify
Calculate/Convert
Compare
Examine
Illustrate
 4 ANALYSING elements, relationships, principles of classification, etc.

Select/Identify
Analyse/Compare
Discuss/Explain
Compare 
 5 EVALUATING logical coherence of material studies, practical application, etc. Evaluate/Recommend
Suggest
Compare
Propose/Solve
 6 CREATING by means of deduction of abstract relationship, suggestion of new methods and ways of classification, etc.  Design
Develop
Arrange/Order/Predict/ Create


ANNEXURE C
LIST OF TERMS THAT IS GENERALLY USED WHEN SETTING QUESTIONS

The following is a list of terms that is generally used when setting questions:  
1. Describe  Write down the characteristics of something in a logical and well-structured way 
2. Discuss/Reason Investigate and state critically the aspects of the matter or statement 
3. Compare Highlight similarities and differences.
The learner should not discuss or describe one matter first and then go to the next.
4. Arrange/Order Order concepts, statements or descriptions according to a particular criterion
5. Identify/Select  Identify the essential characteristics of the matter 
6. Evaluate/Discuss critically Assess the basis of a particular point of departure or criterion. Highlight the strengths and weaknesses after the facts and/or points of view have been considered. 
7. Plan  Plan a method/modus operandi, e.g. an experiment 
8. Name/Give/State Give the basic facts without discussion
9. Explain/Clarify Make clear, state simply so that the reader can understand.
Mere stating of fact is not sufficient.
10. Label Label for a sketch or a diagram
11. Analyse Divide into parts or elements and explain the relationship
12. Distinguish Highlight the details that distinguish one thing from another (differences)
13. Predict Anticipate what would happen
14 Summarise Briefly highlight the main aspects of the whole issue/content, but retain the essence – give an overview
15. Calculate Apply mathematical calculations to reach an answer


ANNEXURE D
LIST OF TEXTBOOKS APPROVED BY THE DBE

TEXTBOOK  PUBLISHER 
1. Focus Tourism Grade 10–12 Maskew Miller Longman 
2.Oxford Successful Tourism Grade 10–12  Oxford University Press
3.Solutions for all Tourism Grade 10–12 Macmillan S Africa
4.Spot on Tourism Grade 10–12 Heinemann Publishers
5.Top Class Tourism Grade 10–12 Schuter & Shooter
6.Via Afrika Tourism Grade 10–12 Via Afrika
Last modified on Friday, 25 June 2021 09:05