Friday, 25 June 2021 09:05

RELIGION STUDIES GRADE 12 - EXAMINATION GUIDELINES 2021

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RELIGION STUDIES
EXAMINATION GUIDELINES
GRADE 12
2021

TABLE OF CONTENTS Page 
1. INTRODUCTION   3
2. ASSESSMENT IN GRADE 12  4
3. ELABORATION OF THE CONTENT FOR GRADE 12 (CAPS)  4
4. CONCLUSION  6

1. INTRODUCTION
The Curriculum and Assessment Policy Statement (CAPS) for Engineering Graphics and Design outlines the nature and purpose of the subject Engineering Graphics and Design. This guides the philosophy underlying the teaching and assessment of the subject in Grade 12.
The purpose of these Examination Guidelines is to:

  • Provide clarity on the depth and scope of the content to be assessed in the Grade 12 National Senior Certificate (NSC) Examination in Engineering Graphics and Design.
  • Assist teachers to adequately prepare learners for the NSC examinations.

This document deals with the final Grade 12 external examinations. It does not deal in any depth with the School-based Assessment (SBA), Performance Assessment Tasks (PATs) or final external practical examinations as these are clarified in a separate PAT document which is updated annually.
These Examination Guidelines should be read in conjunction with:

  • The National Curriculum Statement (NCS) Curriculum and Assessment Policy Statement (CAPS): Engineering Graphics and Design
  • The National Protocol of Assessment: An addendum to the policy document, the National Senior Certificate: A qualification at Level 4 on the National Qualifications Framework (NQF), regarding the National Protocol for Assessment (Grades R–12)
  • The national policy pertaining to the programme and promotion requirements of the National Curriculum Statement, Grades R–12

2. ASSESSMENT IN GRADE 12
2.1 FORMAT OF THE QUESTION PAPERS
The external examinations will comprise two question papers of TWO HOURS EACH. The question papers have equal weighting, and carry 150 marks each. The papers will assess the learner's knowledge of all content in Grade 12, as well as knowledge of the subject from Grades 10 and 11. Content from these grades may comprise up to 15% of each of the two papers.
Examinable Topics from Grades 10 and 11 in Grade 12

GRADE 12 PAPER 1  GRADE 12 PAPER 2 
Major dimensions common to all religions (from Grade 10) Religion and the state (from Grade 11)
  Types of rituals and their roles (from Gr 11)

Each valid point will be allocated two marks, e.g. a 10-mark-question will require five valid facts. However, for SECTION A of Paper 1, only ONE mark will be awarded for each fact, unless otherwise indicated.
2.2 COGNITIVE LEVELS
Formal assessment in Religion Studies caters for a range of cognitive levels, as follows:

WEIGHTING(%)  COGNITIVE LEVEL DESCRIPTION  BLOOM'S TAXONOMY 
30% Recall (knowledge) Levels 1 and 2
40%  Comprehension  Levels 3 and 4
30%  Analysis, application, evaluation and synthesis Levels 5 and 6


3. ELABORATION OF THE CONTENT FOR GRADE 12 (CAPS)
The religions that must be studied for the subject are chosen on the basis of their presence in South Africa. These are:

  • African Traditional Religion/African Religion
  • Hinduism
  • Buddhism
  • Baha'i Faith
  • Judaism
  • Christianity
  • Islam
  • Taoism

Some topics or subtopics in the CAPS document (under 'Outline of what is to be taught') are indicated as 'Specialisation in one religion.' This means that while the relevant content must be studied with regard to all eight religions listed above, the topic or subtopic should be studied in depth with reference to only one religion, as chosen by the candidate.
While recommended textbooks provide the core content of the subject, the study of this subject must include topical issues that impact on the inter-relationship between religion and society. It is therefore essential that learners are knowledgeable of media coverage (both current and recent national and international developments that impact on religion).
PAPER 1
Candidates will be required to answer THREE questions: one compulsory question (short questions of 50 marks) and a choice of two out of three or four questions of 50 marks each.
SECTION A (Compulsory)
In SECTION A, questions require answers that comprise one word and short paragraphs. This section also includes questions that require short explanations and brief descriptions.
Question types include one-word answers, true/false questions (with reasons), matching items and multiple-choice questions.
NOTE: In this section, each fact carries ONE mark, unless otherwise indicated.
SECTION B (Answer TWO out of three or four questions.)
Questions focus on interrogating a range of sources, such as texts, maps, graphs, etc. and include comparative questions. The required answers range from short responses to paragraphs.
In this section, the topics to be assessed are as follows:

  • Conceptual distinctions, e.g. identity, uniqueness, unity, similarity, difference and comparability
  • Appreciation of the uniqueness of various religions
  • Religious teachings
  • Religious freedom, human rights and responsibilities
  • Investigate media coverage on public issues that have religious implications:
    • Evaluate media coverage of religious issues
    • Investigate factors influencing religious issues
    • Present findings
  • Religion in areas of recent conflict in South Africa, Africa and the world:
    • Analyse the situation
    • In what ways is religion part of the problem?
    • In what ways is religion part of the solution?

PAPER 2
This question paper consists of four or five questions. Candidates will be required to answer only three questions. All questions will carry equal marks, i.e. 50 marks each.
Questions will focus on analysing and interpreting generic issues pertaining to religions. Candidates are expected to present a position on the issue/issues from a Religion Studies perspective, and to argue this position and critique it. A source can be included to act as a stimulus.
In this question paper, the topics to be assessed are as follows:

  • The central teachings in one religion (with specialisation in ONE religion)
    • The nature of divinity
    • The nature of the world
    • The nature of humanity, with reference to community and the individual
    • The place and responsibility of humanity in the world
    • The origin and the role of evil
    • The overcoming of evil
    • Life after death
  • The role of rituals in religion
  • Internal differences in a NUMBER of religions (with specialisation in ONE religion)
    • Main features of such differentiations
    • Explain the main features of these groups with reference to Teaching, Governance and Practice
  • History and present-day dynamics of interreligious relationships in South Africa as well as in the international community
    • Relationship between politics and religion (colonialism, imperialism, liberation and transformation)
  • Normative sources in various religions
  • Ways of interpreting normative sources (hermeneutical principles) (with specialisation in ONE religion)
    • Actual interpretation of normative sources
    • Interpreting in detail one normative source
  • Religion and the sciences
    • Examine the changing relationship between religion and the natural sciences
    • Creation and evolution from scientific and various religious viewpoints
  • Analysis of at least TWO secular world views. The four stipulated world views in the CAPS are atheism, agnosticism, humanism and materialism.
  • The origin, purpose and influencing factors behind at least TWO secular worldviews
  • Developing a strategy towards solving a major social problem, as specified below

For the final examination 2021 and supplementary examination/Senior Certificate Examination 2022:

  • Moral degeneration
  • Xenophobia and racism
  • Gender Based Violence

For the final examination 2022 and supplementary examination/Senior Certificate Examination 2023:

  • Euthanasia
  • Substance abuse
  • Environmental degradation

For the final examination 2023 and supplementary examination/Senior Certificate Examination 2024:

  • Teenage Pregnancy
  • Crime and corruption
  • Marriage and divorce

NOTE: The stipulated major social problems must be studied in the context of religious teachings. Such teachings may be chosen from a variety of religions. At the end of 2023, the topics for the three-year-cycle will be repeated, unless replaced by a more recent Examination Guidelines document.

4. CONCLUSION
This Examination Guidelines document is meant to articulate the assessment aspirations espoused in the CAPS document. It is therefore not a substitute for the CAPS document which teachers should teach to.
Qualitative curriculum coverage as enunciated in the CAPS cannot be over-emphasised.

Last modified on Friday, 25 June 2021 09:15